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The Australian government is giving $2 million in funding to a blockchain project which will assess how the technology and data analytics can integrate distributed energy and water systems into cities.

The funding for the project based in Freemantle city is part of the Smart Cities and Suburbs Programme.

It is anticipated that other project participants, infrastructure and technology partners, will bring a further $4.3 million to the two-year project, which is due to kick off in January 2018.

Australian blockchain energy technology firm Power Ledger, along with the Curtin and Murdoch universities and other partners will trial the use of blockchain-powered distributed energy and water systems. With the help of blockchain technology and data analytics, the work of a large solar power plant, rooftop photovoltaic (PV) panels, a precinct-sized battery, an electric vehicle charge station, and precinct water treatment and capture systems will be controlled to demonstrate the interconnected infrastructure of future smart cities.

It is anticipated that blockchain technology and data analytics will enable the control of a large solar power plant, rooftop photovoltaic (PV) panels, battery storage, an electric vehicle charge station, and water treatment and capture systems that demonstrate the interconnected infrastructure of future smart cities.

“We will develop a smart metering, battery storage and blockchain trading system to allow energy and water efficiencies between critical dispersed infrastructures that would otherwise have required physical co-location,” commented Professor Greg Morrison at Curtin University. The university is in charge of the project management and it will carry out the research underpinning the project.

Power Ledger will provide the transactional layer for the renewable assets and the ownership model for the battery, which will be community owned. Murdoch University will provide “research support on alternative district water supply and storage schemes, and on the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and Data61 for megatrend analysis, risk analysis, statistical forecasting and systems modelling.”

The Curtin Institute for Computation and Data61 will provide the data analytics.

“Funding which allows research to explore alternative water and energy systems has the potential to significantly reduce infrastructure development costs for decades to come,” said Dean Mudford, COO of Landcorp, which will monitor the project’s success in order to explore alternative water and energy systems that are connected to smart technology

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Claire Volkwyn
I am an experienced content director with specialist skills in writing about the smart energy and smart metering sectors globally. I have worked across the entire power value chain in Africa and globally for almost two decades. I am passionate about power and smart energy and the evolution and transition we are undergoing. This really is one of the most exciting markets to be part of and I love being part of this journey.