Smart Meters

News and insights into the latest developments in smart meters technology, utility deployment plans and the use of advanced metering infrastructure to improve customer service and demand response strategies. The focus will also include trends in wireless or fixed communications such as power line carrier (PLC) or wireless ad hoc networks over Wi-Fi, wireless mesh networks, low power long-range wireless (LORA), ZigBee (low power, low data rate wireless), and Wi-SUN (Smart Utility Networks).

Expand SCADA with flexible high-end metering data

High-end polyphase electronic meters are a very versatile addition to a SCADA system. Next generation meters can communicate directly with a SCADA master station through communications processors, or they can poll existing remote terminal units (RTUs) in the substation, providing real time current, voltage, watt, and var data, and more.

Historically electrical substations have been a combination of dissimilar, independent islands of automation. Over time utilities have added devices to accommodate individual requirements in response to specific needs. These devices include panel meters; voltage, current, watt, and var transducers; capacitor controls; event loggers; digital fault recorders; and power quality data collectors.

New iMEGA gateway due in the new year

[img:Karl Scheuber Product Manager Converge_0.JPG|Karl Scheuber,

Technology alliance aids customers seeking energy metering solution

Don WallaceDenver, CO, U.S.A. --- (METERING.COM) --- December 11, 2006 – M2M Data Corporation, an Internet-based Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) company, and TransData, a global supplier of advanced metering infrastructure and wireless data telemetry solutions for utilities, have entered into a technology alliance under which the two companies will combine technologies to provide a comprehensive offering for customers seeking an enterprise-wide energy metering solution.

California metering

There are a number of key drivers that have forced most utilities in the United States to at least initiate investigation into advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). For electric utilities across the US, the most far-reaching change established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) is the aggressive action required in the areas of advanced metering and demand response. But California has been subject to over 300 pieces of legislation that, if they haven’t already, will very quickly sway any remaining ambivalence.

Harnessing advanced metering for kyoto compliance

Most European countries have neglected to integrate advanced power metering into energy efficiency strategies despite the pressing need to reduce CO2 emissions. The European Environment Agency noted in 2005 that only two of the EU15 member states – Sweden and the United Kingdom – could anticipate meeting their burden sharing targets under the Kyoto Protocol.1 All others were projected to be significantly above their commitments.

Advanced metering penetration and the regulatory challenges

Demand response has an important role to play in both the wholesale and retail electricity markets in the US – but advanced metering and the other technologies needed to support significant demand response deployment as yet have little market penetration.

These are among the main conclusions of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) Staff Report ‘Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering’, prepared as a requirement of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) to review these and other demand response issues following the enactment of the Act. “The fact that we were specifically asked by Congress to review advanced metering is recognition of its importance in demand response,” says FERC economist David Kathan, who led the team that prepared the report. “And we also aimed to provide information that would be useful for discussions at the state level on advanced metering.”

Ontario’S smart meter initiative Lessons learned from the opening of the...

Electricity jurisdictions in the United States and abroad are watching the province of Ontario, Canada with interest. In April 2004, the Ontario government announced a bold initiative that would see the installation of smart meters in every home by 2010. Ontario has a population of approximately 12 million and some 90 electricity utilities. The province is also among the highest per capita consumers of energy in the world. Smart meters are key to Ontario’s plans to create a conservation culture in the province.

Ontario’s smart meter initiative Province’s electricity distributors begin first wave of...

The Province of Ontario is committed to advancing an energy policy that will ensure a vibrant, reliable and sustainable electricity industry for future generations. And like so many other jurisdictions around the globe, Ontario’s expanding economy and population growth in recent years has resulted in a measurable increase in electricity demand.

Forty percent of Canadians call Ontario home – a geographic area that spans over 1 million km2. The province generates an estimated $500 billion in gross domestic product (GDP), a figure that is larger than the GDP of Austria, Belgium or Sweden. Manufacturing represents the core of the province’s industry, but industries in the natural resource sector also contribute significantly to this vibrant economy.

Finnish utility signs up for AMR system

Finnish FlagJyskä, Finland --- (METERING.COM) --- December 8, 2006 – Valkeakosken Energia Oy of Finland has appointed Enermet to supply automatic meter reading services to all its 11,500 customers, using the Enermet AIM AMR system. Enermet will also supply the field devices, and will act as a full service provider in the delivery of the field devices and the collection of the metering data. This data will be read with Enermet’s AIM system and transferred to Valkeakosken Energia’s customer information system through the Enermet AIM integration interface.

Reduction of water losses from the study of consumption patterns

The measurement and management of the water loss index tends to be a problem in most water distribution companies. Therefore, these companies currently are demanding the implementation of specialised systems for the determination of this parameter, based on real time telemetry platforms, to enable on going monitoring and decision making across the water distribution network.

It is necessary to know accurately at each moment in time the final destination of all the water that is injected into the water distribution network. However, to actually obtain such data is extremely difficult, and it is assumed that a portion of the water is ‘lost’ on its way to the consumer.

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