Search

Itron - search results

If you're not happy with the results, please do another search.

Metering, Billing/CRM Latin America: Conference Program 2008

Metering, Billing/CRM Latin America, 2008

 11 a 13 de agosto de 2008

Seminário pré-conferência sobre proteção da receita

Segunda-feira, 11 de agosto de 2008 

Sessão 0.1.1

A importância da TI na luta contra perdas

Presidente: Denis Maia, Presidente, Choice Tecnologia, Brasil
09h00 - 09h30
Boas-vindas e um panorama da extensão das perdas não-técnicas
Denis Maia, Presidente, Choice Tecnologia, Brasil
09h30 - 10h00

Dupla estratégia para o combate de perdas na Light
José Geraldo Pereira, Superintendente de Recuperação de Receitas, Light, Brasil

It’s DISTRIBUTECH Time! What to expect in 2020

With so much new and exciting in the energy delivery space, DTECH is a must-attend for anyone who works with energy on the distribution side of the grid. Here’s a quick look at what to expect in San Antonio.

Smart Grids Latin America: Conference Program

Smart Grids Latin America

19 a 21 de Outubro de 2009

Seminário pré-conferência/ Workshops

Segunda-feira, 19 de Outubro 2009

Workshop pré-conferência:SMART METERING E SMART GRIDS
Sessão 0.2.1

Workshop dirigido por: Howard Scott, Diretor, Cognyst Advisors, Estados Unidos
09h00 - 10h40

Parece que tudo em nosso ramo de indústria move-se devagar. Ano após ano participamos de conferências onde quase não há novidades. Surpresa! Governantes de todo o mundo de repente perceberam que a solução para sair da crise econômica mundial é investir em infra-estrutura. A construção de novas estradas, estações de tratamento de água e escolas fazem parte da solução tradicional. Mas este ano eles têm uma nova opção - infraestrutura em concessionárias de energia elétrica. Smart Grids! Redes inteligentes para redução de custos de energia (muito oportuno quando se constata que a crise financeira seguiu-se à escassez mundial de petróleo). E não se pode operar uma rede inteligente sem contar antes com um sistema de medição inteligente! Quem imaginaria que um assunto tão enfadonho como medição fosse gerar tanta euforia? Este workshop vai tratar de vários tópicos relacionados a medição: da introdução básica ao material mais avançado relacionado à evolução das concessionárias de energia elétrica. O mundo da medição finalmente tornou-se excitante. Não é surpreendente?

11h10 - 12h40

Electricity meter sensor technologies

The heart of any solid state electricity meter is the current sensor, and selection of the correct type of sensor for the metering application is more than a matter of engineering debate. In globalised meter markets, manufacturers need to differentiate their products. Some compete on price, some on reliability, some on performance and some on functionality. The choice of sensor type impacts on all these areas, and is the determining factor in some.

THE KEY SENSOR REQUIREMENTS

The sensors in the majority of meters measure instantaneous power. The rest of  the meter accumulates the power over time to calculate the total energy (kWh) taken from the supply and presents this information to the utility for bill calculation.

SE-240 – the modular open architecture meter

SE-240 - the modular open architecture meter

EPRI has designed and tested a new smart electronic residential meter that incorporates several features ideally suited to the needs of utilities in worldwide deregulated electricity markets.

Epri's New SE-240 Meter

The new meter, called the SE-240, has plug-in modules that allow utilities to offer different customer services and enable different entities to own the meter and the means to open access. What’s more, the SE-240 is the only meter on the market today that features an open architecture interface, which makes it possible for modules to be manufactured by any vendor. In addition, the SE-240 has imbedded ANSI C12.19 tables that allow two-way communications for digital information, high frequency current and voltage data, load profiles, demand data and security information.

Electricity meter sensor technologies

First, an assumption: I take it as read that solid state sensors are the future for electricity metering and that Ferraris (the old disc meter) is dead. I will go further – I would delete it from my spell checker if I didn’t still harbour expensive automotive ambitions.

The heart of any solid state electricity meter is the current sensor, and selection of the correct type of sensor for the metering application is more than a matter of engineering debate. In globalised meter markets, manufacturers need to differentiate their products. Some compete on price, some on reliability, some on performance and some on functionality. The choice of sensor type impacts on all these areas, and is the determining factor in some.

Handheld survey: can an investment in handheld units be justified?

Handheld survey: can an investment in handheld units be justified?

As a first step towards full AMR, many utilities seeing the need to move away from conventional meter reading but reluctant to make the large investment required by an AMR system are investing in handheld units. In this article several major manufacturers of handheld computers respond to some frequently-asked questions.

Venture Investment In Metering: A Panel Perspective

By Matt Lecar

Nancy_Floyd
Nancy Floyd

By contrast, the energy utility business has seen only a modest pace of technological innovation over the last century. In the case of electric metering, the analogue electromechanical device i n most homes and businesses in North America would be instantly recognisable to Thomas Edison, who filed the first metering patent in 1881 (from that other Menlo Park, in New Jersey).

Philip Mezey: The desire to serve

The interviews will include leaders of some of the world’s biggest companies: examining their leadership style, and giving them a chance to share their...

Energy customer care, billing and metering

Customer Information Systems (CIS), a hub for customer-facing and revenue cycle processing activity, is the most expensive item in a CIO application portfolio, taking up to 30% of an energy company’s application budget.

The CIS market has reached the third maturity level. The first stage (internally built custom solutions), a dominant CIS implementation model until the mid-1980s, was replaced by the proliferation of systems integrator (SI)-leveraged one-off solutions (e.g. Customer 1, Service 2000, IBM’s (Nipsco) CIS for MVS). In the mid- 1990s, SIs began exiting the CIS product market. That created an opportunity for independent software vendors (ISVs) like SPL WorldGroup, Indus, Peace Software, Lodestar and Soluziona, to enter the CIS product market and start building configurable CIS products aimed at meeting the requirements of the transitioning energy markets and the increased customer-centric focus required for retail competition.

Although a relatively small market (estimated <$1 billion worldwide) the significant growth potential, which was estimated to be 11% during the active retail market restructuring, attracted customer care and billing providers from other deregulated verticals such as telecoms (Kenan Systems, Custima, and Convergys), as well as enterprise solution providers (ERP: SAP, PeopleSoft, and Oracle; CRM: Siebel) which verticalised their offerings to meet energy markets’ needs. Concerned with functional complexity, lack of domain expertise, and sensing overall lack of demand due to a retail restructuring slowdown – market growth turned out to be less than half the initial estimate – many of them, in particular telecom vendors, have exited the energy CIS marketplace.

Meter data management systems

A growing debate exists in the US over the need for, and timing of, meter data management systems used to manage large volumes of meter data generated from Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems. While some utilities are rushing to implement AMI, others are thinking first about the need for an application to collect, store and process data for billing and other uses.

A utility manager recently called me with a question that is being asked much more frequently these days: “We’re planning to implement AMI soon and are concerned about managing the data. What do you suggest we do to handle all of that data?”

Smart water metering: a pioneering approach

By Mike Busetti and Tony Clement

The energy utilities industry is undergoing a global transformation into the information age based on the assumption that consumers and utilities will gain from collecting and distributing granular, real time information. South East Water is committed to bringing these benefits to its customers. 

LATEST FEATURE