EnBW
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 The final decision has been taken, EnBW management has agreed to construct the largest solar park in Germany.

The 180MW solar facility will be constructed on 164 hectares of land in Werneuchen in Brandenburg.

The energy generated will be able to supply around 50,000 households.

“The size of this solar park will give us a powerful boost in the expansion of our renewable energy portfolio. We are accelerating the expansion of solar energy and thus making it our third pillar”, says EnBW Chief Technical Officer Dr Hans-Josef Zimmer.

Initial cable laying work is due to begin in Werneuchen at the beginning of 2020, with full commissioning expected later that year.

First major solar park without funding

By developing the Weesow-Willmersdorf project, EnBW will demonstrate that solar parks of this magnitude are the first form of renewable technology after hydropower that can be realised without feed-in remuneration from the German Renewable Energies Act (EEG).

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The company is building a solar park without this funding for the first time. A more than 80% reduction in costs in the photovoltaic sector over the last ten years has made this possible. Another contributory factor is the synergy effects due to the size of the solar park.

“We are convinced that major solar parks of this size can be operated economically without funding”, says Zimmer. “But only if the EEG continues to regulate: Renewables first!”

The law stipulates that electricity from renewable energies has priority over other methods of energy generation when fed into the electricity grid. “This and other regulations in the EEG need to be retained so that the investment in renewable energies continues to make economic sense in the future”, says Zimmer.

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European Utility Week
Image credit: Stock